Tuesday, 19 May 2020

MS Disney Magic Cruise Ship, Port of Dover, Kent, England UK

This video of the MS Disney Magic in Dover was taken on the 2nd of June 2020 and added to this blog post on the 4th:


Original post:

A zoomed snapshot of 900 yards showing Disney Cruise Line's MV Disney Magic passenger cruise ship soon after her arrival in the Port of Dover, Kent, England on Tuesday, 19th of May, 2020:


Disney Cruise Line's passenger ship arrival during Coronavirus lock down restrictions May 19th, 2020. Vessel berthed at Cruise Terminalo One (CT1) on Admiralty Pier in Dover Western Docks Revival area of the harbour. Old Customs House shown. Viewfrom A20 Limekiln Street.
View from A20 Limekiln Street across Crosswall Quay to the MV Disney Magic.

The ship wasn't carrying any passengers because of the Coronavirus pandemic on cruise ships and the travel restrictions that were subsequently imposed.

However, the MS Disney Magic entered Dover harbour with crew members from the MS Disney Fantasy and the MS Disney Dream on board who are presumably awaiting repatriation.

Before proceeding to the live-update map of the MS Disney Magic's current position, and photographs of her during a pre-Covid-19 visit to Dover, note the green copper cupola projecting above the ship's stern:


Old Customs Watch House with green copper observation dome (cupola, belvedere) built 1909-1911 by architect, Arthur Beresford Pite. Listed Building. Inner Harbour; Tidal Harbour, Dover Marina (right). View: North Pier (hoverport). Kent.
Customs Watch House, South Pier.
This is the top of the Old Customs Watch House that was designed by architect Arthur Beresford Pite and built between 1909 and 1911.

Customs and Excise officers from here went to the nearby Lord Warden Hotel (blog post) to interview Louis Bleriot (blog post) after the first flight across the English Channel in 1909.

The MS Disney Magic's current location is shown on this A.I.S ("Automatic Identification System") map:





The day after the first photo was taken, the MS Disney Magic moved to the cargo area of the Dover Western Docks Revival, thereby enabling this photo of Goofy on the ship's stern to be taken on the 21st of May:


Figure of the Walt Disney cartoon character, Goofy, on the stern of the Disney Magic passenger cruise ship in the Port of Dover, UK. Ship was built in Italy and entered service in 1998. In Dover harbour during Coronavirus pandemic, Covid-19 travel restrictions.


And this is how Walt Disney's Goofy looked on the 6th of July, 2010, viewed from the Admiralty Pier with the White Cliffs of Dover (blog video) in the background:


Cruise Ship IMO: 9126807, Call Sign: C6PT7. Stockholm (Sweden to Oslo (Norway). Operator: Disney Cruise Line. At Cruise Terminal 2 (CT2), Admiralty Pier, Western Docks. Also Prince of Wales Pier and Cafe; Eastern Docks. Port of Dover, Kent, England.

:
'S funny how Goofy never seems to age... (πŸ˜€)


Photos from the cruise ship's earlier visits to the Port of Dover:


The MS Disney Magic manoeuvering in the Western Entrance of Dover harbour on the 12th of June, 2010:


Owner: Disney Cruise Line. From Lisbon (Portugal), going to Oslo (Norway). Call Sign, C6PT7. IMO, 9126807. View from Prince of Wales Pier. English Channel on left, Admiralty Pier right. The passenger ship is reversing from the Western Entrance towards the Admiralty Pier.


The MS Disney Magic, berthed against the Admiralty Pier of the Western Docks, and the Waasland Sea Barge, in port to remove the SS Spanish Prince WW1 block ship, on the 24th of June, 2010:


Disney Magic cruise ship from Stockholm (Sweden) to Oslo (Norway). Waasland in Dover to remove wreck of Spanish Prince, World War I blockship. View from Prince of Wales Pier of Cruise Terminal 2 (CT2), Admiralty Pier, Western Docks.


From the MS Disney Magic's homepage:

Created with your entire family in mind, the Disney Magic combines classic nostalgia and modern amenities with Disney’s signature service.

Step aboard for spacious staterooms that ensure everyone’s comfort.

Get lost in original Broadway-quality entertainment. Indulge in first-rate dining.

From bow to stern, set sail for unforgettable storytelling that only Disney could bring to life.

Ship's data (as of 2010):

Name: Disney Magic

Owner: Disney Cruise Line

Operator: Disney Cruise Line

Port of registry: Nassau, Bahamas

Builder: Fincantieri Marghera shipyard, Italy

Maiden voyage: July 30, 1998

In service: 1998

Status: In active service, as of 2010

Type: Cruise ship

Tonnage: 83,000 gross register tons (GRT)

Length: 964 ft (294 m)

Beam: 106 ft (32 m)

Draft: 25.3 ft (7.7 m)

Decks: 11

Speed: Cruising 21.5-knot (39.8 km/h), maximum 24 kn (44 km/h)

Capacity: 2,400 passengers

Crew: 945

Call Sign: C6PT7

IMO: 9126807

MMSI: 308516000

Covid-19 exercising: cycling route map and biometrics are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.

Friday, 15 May 2020

Saga of the Lost Covid-19 DIY PPE Face Mask, Dover, Kent, UK

Not overly confident with needle and thread, I had been inordinately pleased with a DIY PPE Coronavirus face mask that I made using a handkerchief, stapler, and an odd length of elastic.

Then, some four days later, on Friday the 15th of May, 2020, I arrived home from a shopping trip and shortly afterwards realized that my face mask was 'gone'.

This "rough and ready" video details the steps I took until the face mask and myself were (happily) reunited:




A (very) minor example of how perseverance can triumph over adversity!

As a 69 year-old pensioner, the video also illustrates the general principle of exploring all possible internal and external avenues whenever something unexpected, or unwelcome occurs in life, and then, irrespective of whatever the experience or outcome may have been, "moving on".

An approach that doesn't accumulate any psychological baggage! (Note 1)

Before I digress too far, here are some photos of the face mask and  notes on its construction.

A  Covid-19 D.I.Y. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) face mask, Mark 1 (altered to Mark 1A in the final photograph):


Basic Materials:


Materials, or components required are a mans handkerchief, a stapler (staple gun), and two equally long pieces of elastic of a suitable length for their purpose. All purchased from Dover, UK charity shops (thrift shops)


The box of three James Pringle mens handkerchiefs, stapler (staple gun), and bag of mixed lengths of elastic had been purchased at different times from various charity shops (thrift shops) in Dover, England.

Front view:


A view from the front, demonstrating how the staples go through all layers of the folded handerchief before attaching the two elastic ear loops. Full construction details are given on the Dover Coronavirus Lockdown Blog UK web page, Saga of the Lost Covid-19 DIY Face Mask, Dover, Kent, UK.


In the Mark II version, I'm going to attach the bottom ends of the elastic ear flaps further down the sides of the mask.

Note the "designer" folds at the bottom corners πŸ˜€ (actually intended to add a little weight so that the mask hangs closer to the face - a consideration for someone who has a nose as big as mine!)

Rear view:


Rear view shows how the staples bridge both ends of the folded handerchief and go through all 8 layers of the cotton mask. Full construction details are given on the Dover Coronavirus Lockdown Blog UK web page, Saga of the Lost Covid-19 DIY Face Mask, Dover, Kent, UK.


Construction details of the homemade mask:

1) Fold the handkerchief twice length-ways so that you now have four layers of material.

2) Fold the short ends of the rectangle inwards until they meet in the middle as shown.

3) Staple across the folded ends so that the staples go through all eight layers of cotton.

4) "Double staple" the  ends of the elastic loops to the mask for durability.


A still from the Friday, 15th of May video:


Homemade Personal Protection Equipment (P.P.E.) face mask made with a handkerchief, staples, and two elastic ear loops. The harbour, Dover Castle and iconic White Cliffs are in the background. Photo taken on a cycling ride during the Coronavirus pandemic


Wearing the homemade face mask at the end of the New Marina Pier in the Dover Western Docks Revival (DWDR) area of the Port of Dover. The famous white cliffs and castle are in the background.


The Mark 1A revision (made on Sunday, 17th of May):


John Latter on the New Marina Pier, Dover Western Docks Revival (DWDR) area of the Port of Dover, Kent, England, wearing a homemade Coronavirus personal protection equipment face mask. Dover Castle's Saxon St Mary-in-Castro church and Roman Pharos on the White Cliffs in background.


I decided to alter the bottom of the mask (using staples, of course) to better follow the contours of my amazingly manly lower jaw.

Once I had done so, I donned the mask and looked in a mirror and was very impressed with the results (more so than the above selfie might appear to warrant!)

However, I have since been plagued by vague but persistent impulses to either operate on people (Γ  la Mathew Gee, a brilliant surgeon) or eat them (Γ  la Hannibal Lector, a less than brilliant psychiatrist).

Watch this space... (or the news πŸ˜€)

Cycling route map and biometrics are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter

Note 1:

In terms of "grumpiness", negativity, viciousness, and malicious gossip, all of which are of unnatural (i.e. of psychological) origin, and symptomatic of a deeper malaise, I've met "pensioners" who are barely out of their teens - and some who have not yet reached them.

And when something unexpected or unwelcome happens in the lives of such people, someone has to pay...

John Latter

Dover Blog - The Psychology of a Small Town

Thursday, 14 May 2020

2/2 First Covid-19 Lockdown Cycle Ride, Dover Seafront, UK

A permitted Coronavirus cycle ride along the promenade from the Eastern Docks to the New Marina Pier, Port of Dover, Kent, England, UK.

After the video there are close-ups of numbers 11 to 20 of the mainly historical local landmarks that are mentioned in the commentary.

The previous post, 1/2 First Covid-19 Lockdown Cycle Ride, contains close-ups of landmarks 1 to 10 (nb "First" in both titles indicates that I'll be making another video of the same route):


The video was filmed on Sunday, 10th of May 2020, using a head-mounted GoPro Hero 8 Black action camera and its built-in microphones.


Entrance to what was once a builder's yard in Tower Hamlets at 13 West Street, CT17 0DU, Dover, England. This is where I live and do private research into Evolution (Internal Evolutionary Mechanism), Psychology (The Archeotrauma, Trauma), and aspeccts of Social Psychology.
Time Lapse Video Start

Two days later I made a three-minute GoPro "Time Warp" (time lapse) video with commentary.

It contains a sequence that also shows the promenade from the Eastern Docks to the New Marina Pier.

Local landmarks, numbers 11 to 20:

Click on a thumbnail for a larger view, or any text link to go to the related blog post.


Victorian Waterloo Crescent Grade II Listed Building. Marine Parade. DHB's Harbour House. Best Western Dover Marina Hotel and Spa, ex-Churchill Hotel, White Cliffs Hotel (Eisenhower and Churchill in WW2), part of ex-Shalimar Hotel right. Royal Cinque Ports Yacht Club.
White Cliffs Hotel at Sunrise
Former White Cliffs Hotel, Waterloo Crescent

Where Prime Minister Churchill and President Eisenhower had dinner during the Second World War.

Now the Best Western Dover Marina Hotel and Spa.

Fairbairn Crane pre-restoration (2011)
Fairbairn Crane

Swan-neck tubular crane of 1868 on Esplanade Quay, ex-Ordnance Quay of Wellington Dock.

There's a working steam-powered version in Briatol

A Grade II Listed Building.

Triple spiral staircase linking Grand Shaft Barracks to Snargate Street. Built on Western Heights 1805-1807 in Napoleonic Wars. Lieutenant (Quartermaster) Charles Wooden, Victoria Cross, died in barracks above in 1876; he rode in Charge of the Light Brigade, Balaclava, Crimean War, 1854.
Grand Shaft, Pentax K100D  (2011)
The Grand Shaft

Triple spiral staircase built during the Napoleonic Wars.

Linked the Grand Shaft Barracks on top of the Western Heights cliffs to Snargate Street below.

Keep built 12th Century by Henry II's Norman architect, Maurice the Engineer (mason), with corner towers and pilaster buttress. English Heritage, Listed building. Medieval Royal Palace of King's Hall, King's Chamber, Guest Hall, and Guest Chamber. View from King's Gateway.
View of the Keep from King's Gate
The Keep, or Great Tower of Dover Castle

Built in AD 1180's by Maurice the Engineer for King Henry II

Contains reconstructed medieval royal palace.

English Heritage Listed Building and Ancient Monument.

Pharos lighthouse built 46 AD, Emperor Claudius, Aulus Plautius governor. Bredenstone: Western Heights. Once St Mary-in-Castro belfry, King Lucius Church. Restored: Gilbert Scott, William Butterfield. Garrison School. Officers New Barracks or Officers Mess. Fire Beacon, English Channel.
St Mary-sub-Castro and Pharos
Saxon St Mary-in-Castro Church and Roman Pharos

Church is 10th century AD, restored by the Victorians.

Lighthouse built AD 46, reign of Emperor Claudius.

Both lie in grounds of Norman 12th century Dover Castle.

Situated on the White Cliffs of Dover overlooking the English Channel. Microwave tower, or mast on the left, radar scanner, or antenna on the right. Low roof of the operations room (control center) is in the middle.
HM Coastguard Station, Dover
HM Coast Guard Station Dover

Located at Langdon Battery, Swingate, on the White Cliffs of Dover overlooking the English Channel.

Two masts of Second World War Swingate Chain Home Radar Station, ex-RAF Swingate, now Swingate Transmitting Station. Also: Coastguard Cottages, Broadlees Bottom, A2 Jubilee Way bypass, White Cliffs of Dover, Eastern Docks, Dover harbour from Prince of Wales pier.
A2 Jubilee Way, Eastern Docks
A2 Jubilee Way Flyover

From Broadlees Bottom, low point in the White Cliffs of Dover, to the Eastern Docks.

Also World War Two Swingate radar masts and former Coast Guard Cottages.

Cross-Channel ferries in front of Eastern Arm pier with Eastern Entrance and English Channel on the right. Owner: P&O Ferries. Route: Dover to Calais (France). MS Spirit of France (departing, left). MS Pride of Canterbury (arriving, right). Port of Dover, DFDS Ferries also an operator.
In front of Eastern Arm pier (2012)
Cross-Channel Ferries

P&O Ferries' MV Spirit of France is on the left and MV Pride of Canterbury is on the right.

DFDS Ferries also operates from the Eastern Docks.

Holland America Line. From Copenhagen (Denmark), going to Amsterdam (Netherlands). Call sign PFRO, IMO 8919257. Southern Breakwater, Western Docks. Also: Western Entrance, Dover Breakwater West End Light, Admiralty Pier Lighthouse. Kent, England.
MV Maasdam, Holland America Line
Western Entrance of Dover Harbour

Southern Breakwater on the left, Admiralty Pier on the right.

Lighthouses undergoing restoration in 2010.

Prince of Wales Pier Light was built 1902. 46 feet high stone tower. Very quick flashing green light VQ, 100+ flashes per minute. Cafe behind lighthouse. Gateway Flats on seafront. Taken from above Cruise Terminal 3, Admiralty Pier, Dover Western Docks Revival.
POW Pier Lighthouse in 2010.
Prince of Wales Pier Lighthouse 

Built 1902. 46 feet high stone tower.

Very quick flashing green light VQ, 100+ flashes per minute.

Cycling route map and biometrics are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.

Wednesday, 13 May 2020

GoPro Hero 8 Timewarp Cycle Video, Urban Coast, Dover, UK

A first attempt (with commentary) at a time lapse video made on Tuesday, 12th of May 2020 - the last day of full Coronavirus Lockdown restrictions as they applied to exercise in England:


All I did was select "Time Warp", the resolution, a linear lens aperture (as opposed to "fish-eye"), and then pressed  the "Start" and "Stop" buttons on my GoPro Hero 8 Black action camera as and when necessary.

Every other setting was selected by the camera's software (I may start messing about with the controls before making another time lapse video, but quite frankly, there just aren't enough hours in the day!)

The video's resolution is 1080p at 30 frames per second. It is 3 minutes long and took over 8 hours to upload to YouTube.

I would shoot 1080p at 60fps, 2.7K or even 4K, if it wasn't for the upload time overhead (plus my clockwork computer isn't exactly sympathetic towards video editing).

Nevertheless, I'm still very pleased with the results πŸ˜€

Cycling from the Eastern Docks along the seafront promenade above the pebble beach to the New Marina Pier of Dover Western Docks Revival (DWDR). ommentary identifies 20 local landmarks, mostly of historical interest. Filmed using a GoPro Hero 8 Black action camera.
First Seafront Cycling Video
A conventional video of a bike ride along the seafront promenade between the Eastern Docks and New Marina Pier identifies 20, mostly historical, local landmarks.

The time warp video route map (of what has become my "standard" daily bike ride) was plotted by a Polar Beat smartphone app in conjunction with a Polar H10 heart rate monitor (review):


A GoPro Hero 8 Black, Time Warp" video made on 12th of May, 2020 - last day of full Covid-19, or Coronavirus Lockdown restrictions applicable to England.  6 Robsons Yard (Tower Hamlets) to Buckland Bridge, Eastern Docks, Dover Western Docks Revival (DWDR) and back.


Outward Route:


Entrance to Robsons Yards Flats, 13 West Street, Dover, Kent, England. Where I (John Latter) do private research into Evolution (a testable Internal Evolutionary Mechanism), Psychology (The Archaeotrauma, Trauma), and Social Psychology. Southern Housing Group.
1-6 Robsons Yard Flats, Tower Hamlets, Dover in 2009.

6 Robsons Yard, West Street, East Street, Tower Hamlets Road, De Burgh Street, Templar Street, London Road, Buckland Bridege.

Buckland Avenue, Barton Road, Frith Road, Salisbury Road, Albert Road, Maison Dieu Road, Woolcomber Street.

A20 Townwall Street, East Cliff, Athol Terrace, East Cliff (Marine Parade).

Dover seafront promenade from the Eastern Docks to the New Marina Pier (Dover Western Docks Revival, DWDR).

Return Route:


A20 Limekiln Street goes to Snargate Street, Townwall Street, and Eastern Docks. Archliffe Road goes to Folkestone. The Viaduct Flyover goes to Admiralty Pier; Elizabeth Street, Bulwark Street, and Hawkesbury Street. Car Wash. Near Port of Dover. Night photography.
Light Trails on Limekiln Roundabout at Night (2010)


New Marina Pier to the Esplanade, Union Street, A20 Limekiln Street to Likekiln Roundabout (that I called Limehouse Roundabout in the video!).

Limekiln Roundabout, Limekiln Stret, Prince of Wales Roundabout, Snargate Street, York Street Roundabout.

York Street, Folkestone Road Roundabout, Folkestone Road, Priory Station Approach Road, Dover Priory Rail Station, Dover Priory Roundabout.

Priory Station Approach Road, Folkestone Road, Folkestone Road Roundabout, Priory Street, High Street.

Tower Hamlets Road, East Street, West Street, 6 Robsons Yard.

Original route map and biometrics (after I remembered to connect my heart rate monitor!) are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.
 

Monday, 11 May 2020

1/2 First Covid-19 Lockdown Cycle Ride, Dover Seafront, UK

A permitted Coronavirus cycle ride along the promenade from the Eastern Docks to the New Marina Pier, Port of Dover, Kent, England, UK.

After the video there are close-ups of numbers 1 to 10 of the mainly historical local landmarks that are mentioned in the commentary.

A second post, 2/2 First Covid-19 Lockdown Cycle Ride, contains close-ups of landmarks 11 to 20 (nb "First" in both titles indicates that I'll be making another video of the same route):


The video was filmed on Sunday, 10th of May 2020, using a head-mounted GoPro Hero 8 Black action camera and its built-in microphones.


Entrance to what was once a builder's yard in Tower Hamlets at 13 West Street, CT17 0DU, Dover, England. This is where I live and do private research into Evolution (Internal Evolutionary Mechanism), Psychology (The Archeotrauma, Trauma), and aspeccts of Social Psychology.
Time Lapse Video Start

Two days later I made a three-minute GoPro "Time Warp" (time lapse) video with commentary.

It contains a sequence that also shows the promenade from the Eastern Docks to the New Marina Pier.

Local landmarks, numbers 1 to 10:

Click on a thumbnail for a larger view, or any text link to go to the related blog post.


Georgian listed building built in 1834. Charles Lightoller moved here in 1916 in the Royal Navy's Dover Patrol, serving on the destroyer HMS Falcon. He once applied for The Spanish Prince which became a blockship in Dover Harbour in 1915.
Charles Lightoller in Dover
8 East Cliff, Marine Parade

Former home of Charles Lightoller, survivor of the 1912 RMS Titanic iceberg disaster.

Moved here in 1916 during World War One after joining the Dover Patrol.

Born 1824, educated King's School Canterbury, entered Bengal Artillery 1842. Transferred Royal Artillery after Indian Mutiny 1857. Married 1863. Made Knight Commander Order of the Bath, Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee 1897, died 1 East Cliff 1899.
1 East Cliff (Marine Parade), Dover
1 East Cliff, Marine Parade

Former home of General Sir Henry Le Geyt Bruce, Knight Commander of the Bath, 1824-1899.

Transferred from Bengal Artillery to Royal Artillery after 1857 Indian Mutiny.

Seaplane Station

First World War RAF or RFC squadron location.


The Mote, or Moat's Bulwark artillery battery has a semi-circular lower level or gun platform and an upper level terrace containing the West Gatehouse or Guardroon ruins. Built by King Henry VIII in 1539, one of his 'little forts'. Re-developed during the Napoleonic Wars.
Moat's Bulwark, A20 Townwall Street
Mote's Bulwark, White Cliffs below Dover Castle 

One of King Henry VIII's 'little forts' of which there were three in Dover.

The other two being the Black Bulwark and Archcliffe Fort.
Autumn (Fall) panorama of Norman Keep and Dover Castle on the Eastern Heights above River Dour valley and Dover Harbour. Houses of Victoria Park above Gateway Flats apartments. Marine Parade Gardens and promenade. History, Travel, and Tourism.
Dover Castle and Gateway Flats
The Gateway Flats

Built as a result of damage sustained during the Second World War.

The Gateway, with 221 flats that all have views of the English Channel, was completed in October 1959 at a cost of one million pounds.

Victorian former Lord Warden Hotel in the Western Docks. Built by architect Samuel Beazley between 1848-1853. Royal Navy's HMS Wasp Shore Station in World War II. Now Lord Warden House used by freight agents. Grade II Listed Building. Port of Dover, Kent, England.
Lord Warden House, DWDR
Lord Warden Hotel (now Lord Warden House)

Where Louis BlΓ©riot (link to blog post) had breakfast after the first flight across the English Channel in 1909.

Ex-HMS Wasp in World War II. Now used by freight agents.

Statue of Matthew Webb who first swam the English Channel on 25 August, 1875, symbolically resting on fish and seashell. Located on seafront between Gateway Flats and Promenade above beach. Webb died trying to swim Whirlpool Rapids below Niagara Falls 24 July 1883.
Matthew Webb, Dover Seafront
Captain Matthew Webb

Bust (or statue) symbolically rests on fishes and seashell above  plinth,

First recorded person to swim the English Channel in 1875. Died Niagara Falls 1883 (USA and Canada border).

Commemorates Rolls' non-stop return flight across English Channel, 2nd June 1910. Co-founder Rolls Royce motor cars. Statue in front of seafront Gateway Flats facing English Channel. Matthew Webb bust is nearby. Skyline: Roman Pharos, St Mary-in-Castro church, Dover Castle.
Charles Rolls facing Strait of Dover
Statue of Charles Rolls, Dover Seafront

In 1910, he became the first man to fly non-stop across the English Channel and back again.

Co-founder of the Royal Aero Club and Rolls-Royce Motor Cars.

Sculpture by Mark Humphrey on Marine Parade commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War (World War One) on November the 11th, 1918. Camden Crescent and distant King's Arms Library shown; plinth where 'The Waiting Miner' once stood is nearby.
Every One Remembered Statue
WW1 Every One Remembered Statue

First World War Centenary Commemorative Sculpture by Mark Humphrey.

Located in Granville Gardens, symbolically facing the English Channel, France, and the Western Front beyond.

Two-dimensional silhouette statue of Jamie Clark, 2012 Olympic Torch holder; Dame Vera Lynn who sang There'll be Bluebirds over the White Cliffs of Dover in World War Two; Ian Fleming, author of 007 James Bond novels who lived at St Margaret's-at-Cliffe. Marine Parade.
Dover Seafront Promenade
Sustrans Portrait Bench, Marine Parade

Silhouette sculpture of Jamie Clark, 2012 Olympic Games Torch holder; Dame Vera Lynn (WW2 song, There'll be Bluebirds over the White Cliffs of Dover; Ian Fleming, author of 007 James Bond novels.


Cycling route map and biometrics are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.


Thursday, 7 May 2020

WW1 Every One Remembered Statue, Dover Seafront, Kent, UK

The World War One statue, "Every One Remembered" by sculptor Mark Humphrey was erected in July, 2019 to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the end of the Great War on November the 11th, 2018.

Contents:

The Sculpture and its Surrounds

Close-up  of the Soldier

Close-up of the Plaque

The statue forms part of the Dover Remembrance Art Trail.


The Sculpture and its Surrounds


Sculpture by Mark Humphrey on Marine Parade commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War (World War One) on November the 11th, 1918. Camden Crescent and distant King's Arms Library shown; plinth where 'The Waiting Miner' once stood is nearby.


The sculpture and its protective housing are located at the southern edge of Granville Gardens where it meets Marine Parade.

1, 7,8, 9 Camden Crescent, built in 1840 (Georgian, Victorian architecture) and damaged in World War Two. Charles Dickens wrote part of Bleak House at 10 Camden Crescent in 1852. Ex-Timber Yard of Mayor Robert Finnis 1796. UXB 1941. Marine Parade, Kent, England.
Camden Crescent at Sunrise, 2011
The building to the left of the statue is what remains of Camden Crescent following German shelling during World War Two.

In 1852, Charles Dickens stayed at the now-demolished number 10 Camden Crescent and wrote part of Bleak House there
Mr H Phillips' statue of 'The Waiting Miner' on Marine Parade, Dover, Kent, England, facing the seafront, the harbour, and English Channel beyond. Originally located at Richborough Power Station in Kent. Donated by Powergen. Now at Fowlmead Country Park, Kent.
The Waiting Miner Statue, 2009
A few feet out of shot to the right is the empty plinth where "The Waiting Miner" statue once stood.

In 2010 it was relocated to Fowlmead Country Park, former site of Betteshanger Colliery, Kent.


Close-up  of the Soldier


Located in Granville Gardens, the sculpture by Mark Humphrey commemorates First World War armistice on November 11th, 1918. Soldier symbolically looks across Dover harbour and English Channel to Western Front in France. Part of Dover Remembrance Art Trail.  Great War of 1914-1918.


In remembrance: bedecked with poppies, the Soldier looks across the beach of Dover harbour and the English Channel towards the Western Front in France where so many were wounded and killed.

Verse four of the "For the Fallen" poem by Robert Laurence Binyon (1869-1943) that was published in The Times newspaper on the 21st of September, 1914:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

Close-up of the Plaque


Royal British Legion remembrance inscription on the plinth of Mark Humphrey's Every One Remembered sculpture that commemorates he 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, 1914-1918. Granville Gardens, Marine Parade, Dover, Kent.


The Royal British Legion inscription reads:

We're saying Thank You to the WW1 Generation.

In this exceptional centenary year, we're leading a national movement to say ‘Thank You’ to all who served, sacrificed and changed our world during the First World War.
We will thank the people of all nations - not just those who fell on trhe battlefields; those who played their part on the home front and those who returned to build a better future. Join us in saying 'Thank You' and ensuring their  legacy is never forgotten.


The main photos were taken during a permitted Coronavirus bike ride on Thursday, 7th of May, 2020..

Covid-19 lockdown: links to cycling route map and biometrics are on this Polar Flow web page.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.
 



Wednesday, 6 May 2020

Unusual Design of Sergeant-Major's House, Dover Castle, Kent

English Heritage have converted two buildings in the grounds of Dover Castle into "Holiday Cottages" that are available for rent by the general public.

The buildings are described on this blog at The Sergeant-Major's House and Peverell's Tower.

This supplementary post is about unusual architectual features of the Sergeant-Major's House.that was built towards the end of the seventeenth, or in the early part of the eighteenth century.

Click on any photo to see a larger view. .

The left-hand photo shows the south-facing "front" of the building (with Peverell's Tower behind), and the right-hand photo shows the north-facing rear



Garrison Battery Sergeant Major's House, then Custodian of the Castle, now English Heritage Holiday Cottage. Also  in view: Outer Curtain Wall, Knight's Road, Peverell's Gateway, Queen Mary's Tower, Town Hall, Police Station, Robsons Yard, Park Inn. Grade II Listed Building.
Garrison Battery Sergeant Major's House, then Custodian of the Castle, now English Heritage Holiday Cottage. Close to Peverell's Gateway (built by King John and Henry III) on Knight's Road, Western Outer Curtain Wall. Grade II Listed Building.  Norman Dover Castle is an Ancient Monument.

In most respects the Regimental the Sergeant-Major's House is classically Georgian in architectural style but the first thought that struck me was:

"Why are the doors at the ends of the building, rather than in the middle?"

Well, I can think of two non-mutually exclusive reasons:

1) The exposed position of the Sergeant'-Major's House on top of the Eastern Heights.

2) The building consists of two houses in one - but as described below, not necessarily identical "houses".

In support of the first suggestion, notice how the dormer windows in the hip-roof are facing north where they have nothing in particular to see.


Concentric 12th Century Norman castle. The Keep (Great Tower) is surrounded by Inner Curtain Wall (Inner Bailey) with Palace Gate. Georgian Sergeant-Major's House is near Knight's Road, Western Outer Curtain Wall. Former home of Garrison Regimental Sergeant-Majors, Castle Custodians.
House is at bottom, right of center.
If, on the other hand the dormers faced south, then there would be stunning, not to mention interesting views across the southern part of the town, part of the Port of Dover, and the English Channel beyond.

And, of course, north-facing dormers miss out on all the sunshine!

This would be an important consideration in Georgian times as indicated by the fact that the basement windows containing the kitchens are facing south.

Garrison Battery Regimental Sergeant Major's House from Gatton's Tower, Dover Castle, England. The Keep (Great Tower) at top; tower of Peverell's Gate on the left; Palace Gate tower top right. Listed Building and Ancient Monument. English Heritage Holiday Cottage.
Gatton's Tower.and Knight's Road.
Kitchens don't just need light to get in, they need opening in order for hot air to get out.

In addition to privacy, the privet hedge around the south garden shown in this 2009 view from Gatton's Tower would be an effective wind break for the lower floors of the house.

The round tower with the conical roof on the left is part of Peverell's Gate.

Garrison Battery Sergeant Major's House, then Custodian of the Castle, now English Heritage Holiday Cottage. Close to Peverell's Gateway (built by King John and Henry III) on Knight's Road, Western Outer Curtain Wall. Grade II Listed Building.  Norman Dover Castle is an Ancient Monument.
North side of Sgt-Major's House

I've repeated the photo of the north-facing side of the house because I think the sloping treetops to the left of the dormers provide a first clue that the exposed position of the Sergeant-Major's was indeed a factor in its design.

Knight's Road runs from drawbridge towards Canons Gate. Western Curtain Wall and Gatton's Tower on right; Georgian Sergeant Major's House on left. Peverell Tower and Sgt-Major's House are English Heritage Holiday Cottages. Listed Building and Ancient Monument.
Peverell's Tower Drawbridge.
Looking south along Knight's Road from the drawbridge of Peverell's Tower and you can see how the growth of the treetops has been affected by the prevailing winds.

The copper-coloured privet hedge surrounding the south garden of the Sergeant-Major's house is visible above the left-hand fence of the drawbridge.

The fact that the entrances to the building are at either end because it once contained two houses doesn't detract from the suggestion that its design was, at least in part, determined by its location.

If the "houses" were identical then each would consists of four rooms, one above the other, and with separate staircases - a most unusual design!

I suspect something else is far more likely, and to illustrate why I think so, take a look at these former Married Quarters in Windsmoor Road, RAF Binbrook, Lincolnshire:


21 Windsmoor Road is the end of terrace house in the center. Whilst serving in the British Army's Royal Corps of Signals John Latter (me!) worked at nearby NATO FSS Stenigot but lived on this RAF station from 1975 until 1978. Ex-wife Janice, and son Jonathan Adam Latter.
Google Earth Street View: Windsmoor Road, RAF Binbrook, Lincolnshire

At first glance you might think that this is a semi-detached double-fronted (ie rooms either side of the front door) house, but this isn't the case:

The front door of 23 Windsmoor Road in the center of the photo is the entrance only to the rooms immediately to the door's left.

The entrance to 21 Windsmoor Road is on the gable end of the building and largely obscured by the conifers to the left of the lean-to.

Okay then, you might think, so these are pretty standard "two up, two down" terraced houses.

Some of the time they were - but some of the time they weren't...

The two smaller bedrooms at the rear of 21 and 23 Windsmoor Road shared a party wall that had a door in it.

Locking and unlocking the appropriate doors could convert number 23 into a three bed-roomed house and number 21 into a one bed-roomed house - and vice versa, of course!

(While serving in the British Army's Royal Corps of Signals I worked at NATO FSS Stenigot but lived at 21 Windsmoor Road from 1975 until 1978).

If the Sergeant-Major's House once contained two separate "houses" then I suspect that they weren't identical (four rooms on top of one another reminds me of lighthouses rather than houses!)

Regimental Sergeant-Majors, or Garrison Battery Sergeant-Majors, are important personages who bridge the gap between Garrison Commanders and their Other Ranks.

Western Outer Curtain Wall on right; drawbbridge on left. English Heritage and Ancient Monument. View from Marina Pier in Dover harbour.
Constable's Gate, Queen Mary Tower
In addition to an office at Garrison Headquarters (perhaps at Constable's Gate), I can imagine the Regimental Sergeant-Major also having an office at his home for a clerk, perhaps a batman, and for dealing with those Other Ranks who would otherwise make the Garrison Headquarters look untidy! ( 😁 )

My overall impression of the Sergeant-Major's House is that it should be viewed as a military Georgian house, not a civilian one.

The photos of the Keep and Constable's Gate were taken during permitted Coronavirus bike rides.

Covid-19 lockdown: links to cycling route maps and associated biometrics are on their respective blog pages.

Abridged versions of this post are also on Facebook and Twitter.